Category Archives: Business

Details released for John C. Maxwell’s Moncton events on Tuesday, Sept. 16

John C. Maxwell
John C. Maxwell

Details have been released for leadership and management expert John C. Maxwell’s visit to Moncton on Tuesday, Sept. 16. The announcement was made on Tuesday, June 24, with a number of community leaders present at Moncton City Hall.

Branded Leadership to the Max, the event is a major professional and personal development opportunity with the goal of empowering, training and inspiring citizens of all ages.

Keynote speaker for the event is John C. Maxwell, recently named the top leadership and management expert in the world by Inc. magazine. He has written more than 70 books on leadership and management, has sold more than 21 million books and has been named to Amazon.com’s Hall of Fame. His organizations have trained more than five million leaders worldwide.

“We are delighted to both support and host this special event featuring two famous people – John Maxwell and Heather Moyse – right here in Greater Moncton,” said George LeBlanc, Mayor of Moncton. “Leadership to the Max is a great opportunity for the citizens of our community to grow, to learn and to be inspired to always do their best, to be their best.”

Heather Moyse
Heather Moyse

Joining Mr. Maxwell for the event is two-time Olympic gold medallist Heather Moyse of Summerside, P.E.I.

“Leadership is critical for the advancement of our community and our region,” said Wayne McDonald, Senior Vice-President of External Relations with Irving Group of Companies, the title sponsor of the event. “J.D. Irving is happy to put our support behind this event because its goal is to build our community leaders, our future leaders, and to make us stronger. I commend the community organizations who have stepped up to the plate to make this happen.”

Leadership to the Max consists of two main events. The morning event is for students and is free of charge. More than 6,000 high school and post-secondary students are expected to attend the event with both speakers at the Moncton Coliseum. The afternoon event is a professional and personal development opportunity for community and business leaders at the Moncton Wesleyan Celebration Centre.

“The Province of New Brunswick is truly thrilled, as am I, to put its full support behind the Leadership to the Max event and help to provide the resources to give over 6,000 youth the opportunity to see and hear two global-class leaders,” said David Alward, Premier of New Brunswick.

“The day of leadership is truly a community event – many organizations came together to bring it to fruition,” said David Hawkins, partner at XYZ Stratégie-Communication. “A very special thank you to our title sponsor, J.D. Irving and Robert Irving in particular, Mayor LeBlanc and the City of Moncton, Pat Armour at Armour Transportation Systems, Kathleen Rayworth of Entrepreneurs’ Forum and Premier Alward and the Province of New Brunswick who were all true believers and really got this project off the ground. And of course, there would be no event without John Maxwell and his local John Maxwell Institute team led by Doug Jones.”

Leadership to the MaxOther community leaders and organizations who made this event possible include RightLane Driver Training, Trans-Canada College, Greater Moncton International Airport, Cordova, Docbraces, Ernst & Young, Clarity, Lounsbury Group and Technology Venture Corporation. Other community partners include Anglophone East School District, District scolaire francophone Sud, CBC Radio 106.1 FM, Wesleyan Celebration Centre, City of Dieppe, Founder’s Dinner, Greater Moncton Chamber of Commerce, Times & Transcript and the Town of Riverview.

Proceeds from the event will be donated to Junior Achievement New Brunswick.

Tickets for the afternoon event are $150, however an early-bird special of $99 (using promotion code EARLYBIRD) is available until Tuesday, July 15. To buy tickets or for more information, visit www.leadershiptothemax.ca.

John C. Maxwell in Greater Moncton for all-day leadership event on Sept. 16

John C. Maxwell
Internationally acclaimed leadership and management speaker and author John C. Maxwell will be in Greater Moncton for an all-day leadership event on Tuesday, Sept. 16. Reserve that date! More details to come!

In fact, Inc. magazine has just named Mr. Maxwell as the #1 leadership and management expert in the world, so don’t miss this! Read: Top 50 leadership and management experts.

Hump Day: “Buy local” only works when the lights are on and someone’s home

Hump DayHump Day
By Brian Cormier
Wednesday, Oct. 23, 2013
Moncton Times & Transcript
Editorial section

Every once in awhile on Facebook, I see a status update urging everyone to shop locally and support small homegrown businesses.

Sadly, these notes are also interwoven with posts about people spending all their Christmas shopping money in Bangor. Trips are organized. Vacation days are taken from work. Credit cards are spit-shined and buffed to make sure they’re pretty for their trip to the U.S. and getting swiped through all those foreign cash registers.

I’ve never been a fan of cross-border shopping. I can’t imagine the deals are that good to make the time invested driving there even remotely worth it, but apparently from those who are fans of the practice, it’s indeed a worthwhile trek. I much prefer to stick around here and help the local economy. Of course, if I find myself in another city, fine, but I would never travel just to shop.

I like investing in local businesses and artisans as much as I can. I think we have many brilliant entrepreneurs around here who work hard to put out good products for their customers. You may pay a bit more, but the quality and service are usually a mile ahead of anything you’d see in a large chain store.

However, I have a bone to pick to with some local businesses because of something that’s happened to me a grand total of five times in the past year – each time at a different business offering goods and services completely unrelated to the other. The only thing they had in common was that they were a small locally owned retail or service business with one location. As well, their hours of operation were posted to their door.

Come in, we're open!Now, keep in mind that I was trying to give them my money. I run my own consulting business, so I completely understand the pressures of being there for your clients at all hours. Also, I don’t work in a retail environment so my hours are a lot more flexible. I still have to put in the time, mind you, but which 12 hours of the day I work are up to me. They can be in a long stretch or broken up into segments. I get it. The retail environment is tough.

Unfortunately, when you’re a small locally owned retailer, you’re a slave to the hours posted to your front door – at the very least. On top of that, there’s all the paperwork, stocking, cleanup, etc. You have to love it.

My beef is that some locally owned businesses aren’t honouring the hours they have posted. I can’t tell you how insane I get when I speed across town to try and give my money to a locally owned business only find the doors locked up tight and the lights off – and this despite the posted hours on their door. Am I late? No. They aren’t supposed to close for another 30 minutes. Is there a note in the window saying there was a death in the family or an emergency?

Nope, none of that. They just decided to close early, likely because it wasn’t busy. Well, I hate to tell you, my dear local entrepreneurs, but I showed up at your door during your posted business hours with my money in hand and very willing to give it to you. What I was met with was a locked door even though you said you would be open.

Now, I understand things happen, but that’s why you should at least put a note in the window. “Had to close early today for family reasons. Sorry for the inconvenience.” Or whatever reason, really. My point is to at least acknowledge the people like me who are showing up at your door with money to give you when you haven’t held up your part of the bargain, i.e. being open when you’re supposed to.

And if it’s near closing time, you can bet I probably had to speed across town through traffic to make it to your store before you closed. That’s what happened to me last Friday when I zig-zagged through rush hour traffic to get to an establishment before it closed. I got there 15 minutes early with money in hand, but the owner had already left.

So you know what I did, dear local entrepreneurs? I went to a national chain and spent my money there instead. In this particular case, the chain was more expensive, but I knew that there was no way they’d close early. They respect their hours – period!

This has happened to me at a few other places, too. I made a 14-kilometre round trip once to a specialty food store only to find the doors locked up tight – two hours before (what I thought was) closing time. I’d even checked online. Unfortunately, though, the new business hours hadn’t been updated. When I advised the owner, he apologized profusely and offered me a discount coupon – which was obviously the right thing to do. But, to be honest, I’ve never been back, so the discount likely won’t be used.

Another time, I showed up at a small food retailer 20 minutes before closing only to find the doors locked. Yet again, it wasn’t busy so they decided to close early. I know this because the owner saw me trying to open the door, so she re-opened the store and told me why she closed early. I think that was another 15-kilometre round trip. I handed her my money after getting what I needed and she closed up shortly after that, I imagine. I’ve been there since many times. They’ve always been open, thankfully.

If you’re a local retailer, let me be clear: I want to give you my business but please respect your business hours. If you don’t, the big chains will, without fail. And if I’m in a particularly ornery mood, I just might not give you another chance.

Hump Day: There are perks and pitfalls in marching to your own drum

Hump DayHump Day
By Brian Cormier
Wednesday, Sept. 11, 2013
Moncton Times & Transcript
Editorial section

Every week, I put together a free newsletter for friends, clients and readers. My Sunday evenings are mostly spent putting it together to send out on Monday. Come rain or shine since December, I’ve made a point of ensuring the newsletter gets sent!

One of the sections in the newsletter contains articles of lists, for example: “10 best perks for employees,” “4 ways to tell you’re about to be fired,” “25 best websites for business,” etc. Lists like these are very popular online and generate a ton of hits for the authors. They’re usually always quick reads, too, which is good if you’re in a hurry — which most people seem to be.

In my never-ending search for entrepreneurship work-life balance (which many of these articles promise me is achievable), I’ve come across so much conflicting advice that it just boggles the mind. I’ve come to the conclusion that if you’re in business for yourself, you just pretty much have to do what works for you and your sanity. And when you feel something start to snap, it’s time to make a change.

One article will tell you to book a month’s worth of vacation every year. Another one will tell you that six weeks is what you deserve, not a month. And yet another one will tell you that if you even take five minutes to go to the bathroom, well then you deserve nothing short of immediate bankruptcy and a public flogging for daring to look away from your computer screen for five minutes like the uncommitted jerk you are!

I have to admit, I’m a bit confused. I’m terrible at taking vacations, so when I read an article about how healthy and necessary it is to take time off (I agree, by the way), I read another one shortly afterwards that berates any entrepreneur who’s so pathetic that they feel the need to actually rest.

Isn’t that what three hours of sleep per night are for? You can rest then. Oh, and there’s Christmas Day. Maybe. And that’s only if you didn’t sleep for six months in order to ensure the universe doesn’t fall apart while you’re chowing down on your turkey dinner while trying not to collapse from fatigue face down onto your plate.

Perhaps I need to find a happy medium — like taking a week off and crying the entire time. Eventually, I’d probably faint from dehydration from shedding so many tears and would end up in the hospital, hopefully heavily sedated. That would be a good way to rest, no? OK, maybe not. Maybe then I could write one of those list articles and post it to my blog. “10 ways to stop listening to others’ dumb advice.”

In fairness, there’s always something in these articles that provides some level of wisdom. Not everything, but something. I just wish it wasn’t all so contradictory at times. One article tells you to work 24/7 or you’re not worthy of calling yourself an entrepreneur, while another tells you that if you’re not home by 5 p.m. every day, your business owns you and you don’t own your business and shame on you, loser!

So many clichés, so little time. Everything has a nugget of truth in it, I just wish there was a rule book out there that would give a clear set of failure-proof guidelines. I do sincerely think that taking six weeks off per year and going home at 5 p.m. every night is a ridiculously unrealistic dream if you own your own business. There are exceptions, of course, but I haven’t met anyone yet.

It’s hard work, but I love it. It’s challenging and rewarding. Sure, I get tired. Who doesn’t? But you have to give yourself a break sometimes. I know I have to give myself a swift kick when I get tired and berate myself. An entrepreneur I was talking to the other day was complaining that he got tired and had to rest. He blamed it on age. When I asked him what time it was, he said it was 9 p.m. when he got tired. Yeah, it was 9 p.m., but he was probably awake at 5 a.m. and working diligently since then. Tired at 9 p.m.? You should get a medal, not feel bad about it. We’re only human.

I’ve done that too many times. I’m hard on myself for feeling worn out by 5 p.m., not taking into account that I’ve been awake since 6 a.m. and worked the entire day, including a working lunch with clients and no other breaks. So, 11 hours later, I need to rest for a bit and watch television and perhaps even, horrors, take a short nap. Others in the regular working world, meanwhile, are home by 5 p.m. and had a few breaks and an entire hour for lunch. And paid vacation. And benefits.

I don’t begrudge them anything, of course, but there are benefits to being an entrepreneur, too. The harder I work, the more money I make. I set my own schedule and don’t have to answer to anyone — except for my clients, of course. If I want to make more money, I just get more clients or more projects. If I worked for someone else, especially if you work for a set salary, earning more money is extremely difficult. Raises are often so minuscule and far apart that you barely even notice them.

But at least the income of a regular salaried job is usually predictable, barring a layoff. When you’re in business for yourself, there are good months and bad months — good years and bad years. Last year for me was not great. The year before was good. This year is spectacular and I’m on track for my best year yet. For that, I’m grateful.

So I’m not sure which lists to believe. Should I risk a good year and take time off that I really can’t afford to take? Or should I continue working like a dog? I’ll take working like a dog for now, thank you very much. I’ve been poor; I’ll take being tired any day of the week over wondering how I’m going to pay the bills.

City of Dieppe launches ExpansionDieppe

ExpansionDieppeBAdge
The City of Dieppe announced today that the Economic Development Corporation of the City of Dieppe will now be known as ExpansionDieppe. The new name is effective today.

ExpansionDieppe is the City of Dieppe’s land development agency. Its goal is to ensure that land development in Dieppe occurs in a timely and efficient manner by providing vital information, seeking partnerships and acting as a facilitator for property development and investments through advice, expertise, support and strategic site data.

The name ExpansionDieppe – along with the new tagline Seize Our Momentum – capitalizes on Dieppe’s significant continued growth. The new name reflects one of Dieppe’s main goals: to expand in a sustainable and responsible manner. As well, the name is shorter, easier to remember and is the same in French and English. The new branding includes a logo, website, video and social media channels such as Facebook,Twitter and LinkedIn.

“Dieppe is a young and dynamic city with the second-highest population growth in Atlantic Canada,” said Yvon Lapierre, Mayor of Dieppe. “In fact our population has increased by 50 per cent since 2001 and our tax base has tripled over the past 10 years. We are home to some of the most successful entrepreneurs and businesses not only in New Brunswick, but regionally and nationally. We have been demonstrating strong economic leadership in this community for many years, and this is the next step in continuing along that successful path.”

“This rebranding was undertaken to better reflect the agency’s mandate,” said Alain Parent, President of ExpansionDieppe’s board of directors. “In fact, despite its former name, ExpansionDieppe is not an economic development agency in the traditional sense; our focus is more on growing the City’s tax base through commercial and industrial land development initiatives. This led to some lack of clarity among Dieppe residents, investors and the area’s business community.”

“We add value to our client’s efforts as we work every day to continue the momentum in Dieppe’s successful business climate,” Mr. Parent said.

“The EDCCD’s staff and board of directors remain in place,” says Pierre Dupuis, General Manager of Expansion Dieppe, “however we fully anticipate that this new brand and updated communication tools will allow us to be more effective in the community as we seek to encourage and facilitate growth in Dieppe to the benefit of our residents and the overall economy of Southeastern New Brunswick.”

ExpansionDieppe maintains a strategic inventory of its own land available for development; maintains a database of available land and commercial space; provides current economic data to developers and others seeking to invest in Dieppe; and provides support and advice by helping to ensure that projects move ahead in a timely manner, among a number of other services. ExpansionDieppe also closely monitors and guides development in the Dieppe Industrial Park / Aviation Avenue, downtown Dieppe and Dieppe’s business and technology zone.

“We want to make it as easy and efficient as possible for investors to do business in Dieppe,” said Mr. Dupuis. “We are very excited to continue to have the opportunity of growing Dieppe’s economy through this fresh new look and name.”